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Ja, wir haben ihn etwas früher als erwartet released damit Leute Zeit zum saugen haben und nichts überlastet wird.

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fh2_2.54_release.jpg

Hello and welcome back to another Forgotten Hope 2 update.

We've had about 5 months now since version 2.53 was released, and we have used this time to make a few changes to the mod to improve your experience. We've even managed to squeeze a little bit of brand new content in too! We are thus excited to announce that Forgotten Hope 2.54 will be going live on:

Thursday 25th October 2018

As usual, we'd like to give a big thanks to our players for sticking with us and keeping the servers populated even after all this time. Additionally, we would like to thank our team of betatesters for their dedication to improving our work, as well as our developers for the time and effort they put in to make things happen. Last but not least, none of this would be possible without the web hosting generously provided by Fluestertuete.

We mentioned some new content earlier, and here it is:

ISU152.jpg

The SU-152 had proven itself as a valuable asset to the Red Army from it's introduction in early 1943. However, by the middle of the year it was recognised that the design would need to be adapted, as the KV-1S chassis that it was built on was being replaced in production by the new IS series. The new ISU-152 replaced the older design in production by December of the same year.

Just like it's predecessor, the ISU-152 was primarliy tasked with supporting the infantry in assaults against hardened targets. As such, it was primarily issued with high explosive shells for its 152mm howitzer. While an armour piercing round was developed, these were rare and only slightly more effective against tanks than the blast of the HE shell.

The ISU-152 went through several upgrades during and after the war. One of these was the addition of a 12.7mm DShK machinegun on an anti-aircraft mount. In total, 1885 ISU-152s were built during the war (a further 1357 followed after the war and served into the 1970s), and ours was made by Seth Soldier, who modified our IS-2 made originally by Rad, Toddel and Matt Baker.

ISU_DShK01.jpg
ISU_DShK02.jpg

Originally developed in the late 1920's by Vasily Degtyaryov as the magazine fed DK, the weapon was updated in 1938 with an add-on belt feed by Georgi Shpagin to become the DShK. Conceived of as a light anti-tank and anti-aircraft weapon, it would primarily fall into the role of the latter, either tripod mounted, or fixed to the hatch of an IS or ISU. Ours was made by Seth Soldier.

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Hello and welcome back to another Forgotten Hope 2 update.

Today we have a render that at first glance might look quite similar to the one posted yesterday. On closer inspection though, you find that it is of the main varient of the ISU-152, the ISU-122:

ISU122.jpg

The ISU-122 was a logical modification to the ISU-152. The latter's ML-20S howitzer had had its original carriage used for the A-19 field gun, and this similarity was shared by the ISU mounting. While a prototype had been completed in December of 1943, production of the ISU-122 didn't start until March, when the production of hulls had started to outstrip the production of howitzers.

The ISU-122 was used similarly to ISU-152 as an infantry support vehicle, but its greater accuracy soon found it a role as a formidable tank killer. Despite the lighter ammunition, the ISU-122 did not manage a greater rate of fire over its larger armed brother, primarily due to the antiquated design of the breech of the A-19S. An improved version of this gun that solved this issue, the D-25S, was added along with a redesigned mantlet to make the ISU-122S, but large stocks of the older gun meant that both designs remained in production for the rest of the war.

The ISU-122 did not have the same kind of post-war longevity as the ISU-152, serving until only the start of the 1960s and not receiving as extensive modifications. In total, 1150 ISU-122s were built, and ours was made by Seth Soldier, who modified our IS-2 made originally by Rad, Toddel and Matt Baker.

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Hello and welcome back to another Forgotten Hope 2 update.

Today we have a nice little early Christmas present in the form of a render:

isu152fi.jpg

Amongst the multitude of Soviet tanks captured by the Finns were two ISU-152s, both of which were captured around the Portinhoikka crossroads during the battle of Tali. Tank number 1212 was found stranded at the side of the road with battle damage and a thrown track, but still with a crew and a working gun. After a short fight it was captured, however it would serve out the remainder of the war at a repair centre. It served as a heavy recovery vehicle with the Finnish Army until 1964, when it was transferred to the Parola Tank Museum.

The other vehicle was captured completely intact, and was almost immediately pressed into service. Over the next four days it was painted with Finnish camouflage and markings, went through some evaluations and testing and then finally was used in a counterattack. With a hastily assembled crew who had no real experience operating such a heavy beast, it was hit several times by two dug in T-34-85s. The crew bailed out and the ISU burned.

With their limited experience using the vehicle, the Finns praised it for its hard hitting gun and strong armour, but they disliked how blind, clumsy and slow to aim and fire it was. Seth Soldier modified our original ISU-152, which was made by himself, Rad, Toddel and Matt Baker.

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Hello and welcome back to another Forgotten Hope 2 update.

We'd like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas, and what could be a better present than another StuG? We'd also like to thank everyone who voted for us in the ModDB top 100 mods of the year, and we are looking forward to finding out the results!

sturmi.jpg

In the spring of 1943, the Finnish Armed Forces made a request to Germany about acquiring assault guns. With a positive response, an initial order for 45 was placed, though ultimately only 30 of these would be delivered and paid for. At the same time, training was provided to a small group of Finnish officers and men in Germany, and at their request the order was expanded to include all the support vehicles that would normally equip a German StuG battalion.

On arrival in Finland, the Schürzen and mounts were removed, a wooden tool crate was fitted to the rear deck and spare roadwheel mounts added to the side of the superstructure. The gunshield on the roof was modified to take a DT instead of an MG34, and three tone camouflage was painted over the original dunkelgelb. There were other changes made later, including additional side armour, improved armour for the driver's vision slit and concrete added to the front of the superstructure. The most obvious of these changes was the addition of logs to the sides above the fenders. Known to the Finns as the Stu 40 G, they would quickly pick up the nickname Sturmi.

While the Sturmis were on the front line from the summer of 1943 onwards, they would face their biggest tests at the battles at Kuuterselkä, Tali and Vuosalmi in the midsummer of 1944. Across these three engagements, they would knock out 87 soviet armoured vehicles for only 8 losses. The StuG was by far the most modern armoured vehicle that the Finns had in 1944, and was well liked by its crews, who found it to have excellent outside visibility combined with a good gun, allowing them to see and to shoot first. Perhaps their main complaint was the underpowered engine and narrow tracks limiting its performance off-road.

A further 29 vehicles were delivered that summer before the Finnish capitulation in September, but these would see little service during the Continuation War. Finland still had 45 Stu 40 Gs when they were declared obsolete in 1959, and many of these would go on to be dug in as pillboxes. Our Sturmi was made by Toddel.

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Hello and welcome back to another Forgotten Hope 2 update.

Today we are showing off renders of the G-2 variant of the BF 109, but first:

We'd like to thank all of our fans for voting for us in the second round of this year's ModDB Mod of the Year! Once again, we have managed to get enough votes to earn an honourable mention in the Player's Choice - quite the feat for a mod that has been released for 11 years now.

The G series of the Messerschmitt BF 109 fighters was largely identical to the preceding F series, with most of the changes happening inside. Small incremental changes such as heavier reinforcing of the wing structure and additional cooling scoops for the spark plugs were intended to update the F-4 frame to take the new more powerful DB 605A engine, which increased the available horsepower by over 100 to 1445hp.

g2ger.jpg

Produced starting in early 1942, the G series would go on to be the most numerous of the BF 109s.

The Finns bought 162 of the G series starting in 1943, with the first batch arriving in March. 48 of these were the G-2 variant. The Finns had great success with their Messerschmitts, scoring 667 victories for 34 losses in the air. After the war, they would continue in service with the Finish Airforce until 1954.

g2finn.jpg

Our BF 109G-2 was originally made by Toddel, with Finnish markings added by Matt Baker.

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